Sһοwеԁ tһіѕ video аt Danny’s IEP last January 2006 tο ехрƖаіח ABA tο team.

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25 Responses to “Danny IEP 2006”
  1. TheMags77 says:

    What a beautiful little boy! He is very fortunate to have such a supportive family and team of therapist’s. I am a first year elementary teacher and Psychology major. I saved your video as a favorite because I will definately be watching it again! Thank you for sharing :)

  2. pumpkinfeather says:

    I’ve been trying to get permission to use the music but I haven’t heard back yet. The background music is “Beautiful” by Christina Aguilara. Sorry for the inconvenience.

  3. oldlouise2 says:

    how could i view this video with sound… they have disabled the music…

  4. pumpkinfeather says:

    Thank you – I hope your son’s IEP team will find it helpful! I brought in my laptop to the IEP where I played it for the Team.

  5. oldlouise2 says:

    I love this video.. i think everyone who is involved in an IEP should watch this.. were can i see (hear) it with sound. I would like to show the whole thing at my sons IEP.

  6. pumpkinfeather says:

    Thank you so much for your comment! Coming from someone with first hand knowledge, your comment is particularly meaningful! I would love to ask you, if you don’t mind, what is your perspective on VB ABA?

  7. AutisticWhoLives4God says:

    Very good. I can’t concentrate with any background noise, either. Writing is a much preferred form of communication for me.

  8. Talbottfamily says:

    What a beautiful little boy & wonderful video! Hopefully local schools will support ABA someday so that children on the spectrum can continue to receive these type of therapies while in school. I have faith it will happen! Your son reminds me so much of my 3 1/2 year old boy! I feel so blessed that he is in a wonderful private ABA/VB program and is finally talking. I hope that he will be mainstreamed in kindergarten & will just be seen as a typical boy with quirky traits. Thank you for sharing!

  9. pumpkinfeather says:

    Thank you so much for your comment. We see way too much “in-fighting” in the autism community. Much better for all our children if we support every parent’s choice and value each child for the individual they are. I’m so thrilled to hear about your son’s success! You were a trailblazer!

  10. ians1sis says:

    As mom to a 17 yo son with ASD I am so excited to see parents forging ahead with ABA and sharing their success. We did the same 14 years ago and our son is a fully included student with autism in 11th grade. He still needs lots of supports but was able to move from a screaming, head banging, non-verbal child to a person who belongs at church, school, in his community. He has friends and is in charge of his destiny because he has choices. The cornerstone of all of his learning has been ABA.

  11. pumpkinfeather says:

    Before we chose VB ABA, I did my research. I’m familiar with the autistic advocacy community, many of whom are understandably bitter the world doesn’t accept them as they are. After 3 yrs of errorless teaching, positive reinforcement and assuring his personal dignity during his sessions, he now has options. If he chooses to be an outspoken autie advocate, I will support him 100%. But now he can articulate his anger, instead of banging his head on the floor. BTW, Temple Grandin advocates for ABA.

  12. pumpkinfeather says:

    I have no idea what my child’s future would have been had we not helped him learn to communicate. I do know that he is still special and unique. But now he doesn’t vomit on command when upset or bang his head on the floor. He now has the option to be as autistic as he chooses or subscribe to our rules as an adult. I like to think I’ve given him choices and he knows he will be loved no matter what choice he makes. As for your child, only you can choose the “right” intervention for him. Good luck.

  13. eyebelieve777 says:

    Here in this video you show Einstien who was considered Autistic, but do you think he would have gone on to use his special way of thinking the way he did had he recieved ABA as a child? Had his behaviors been modified so he could tie his own shoes would he have discovered E=MC2. Maybe these intervetions are breaking down what is special and unique about our children so that they can be average and “typical seeming”. I am considering homeschooling my young autistic son….any thoughts?

  14. eyebelieve777 says:

    I am a parent who is concerned about sending her autistic toddler to ABA this year. My primary concern comes from the moths of adults with autism who have been through ABA and felt it was abusive and forced conformity. The kindtree/Autism Rocks website has an article about a pro-autism school, but there is only one that we know of. I am so nervious about this.

  15. pumpkinfeather says:

    Anna, I am so touched by your comment. Thank you very much! I hope Danny grows up to be as thoughtful and insightful as you!

  16. Amwakeupcall1 says:

    this is very good dont take be treated badly or any worse then other children you will always have people wanting to be your freind but its more rare meaning you are much more presuos to the world dont let anyone or thing hold you back you can do anything you put your mind to never take no for an anser!

    love always Anna age 12

  17. stjudesaveslives says:

    Can I modify this video and replace my son’s pictures where Danny’s pictures are? My IEP team needs to see this!

  18. LaciElements08 says:

    Thank you so much for posting this. We have sent this link to our daughters school. It has in it everything we have been trying to say. My favorite part is Danny’s birth … its a fantastic reminder that these children are our babies not a DX or an IEP code.

  19. rachellabrador says:

    The video gave me inspiration and courage to speak as the advocate of my daughter, I will have to show this to her father, who is still in denial.

  20. Mary0373 says:

    This was amazing. Having a child with Autism I can totally relate to this entire video. Thank you so much for making a great video to help people who don’t live it understand. God Bless!

  21. Zuliechiq says:

    This is a truly wonderful video!!
    It says it all … all the best to this beautiful child !!
    ABA is the way :)

  22. Chyanne111 says:

    OMG, I told myself I would not cry but boy did I. I am training in ABA therapy and have been doing research on autism, and decided to look on you tube and I am so glad I did. Thank you for such an intimate look in your life.

  23. moonchild39 says:

    Bravo! I was recently let go from an agency that did short term intensive in-home based therapy; and, I really think if I would have had this presentation as a resource for IEP meetings with school personnel, they would have been able to help kids and families make better choices. I have it now, so THANKS (very much)
    moon

  24. CheriS33 says:

    Cried? I was balling like this lil boy in the video! My daughter has A.D.D.. The school made the first diagnosis. Now they are hell-bent on holding her back, since K. She’s now in first, it’s been a rough month, and all the school is willing to offer is retention. They can’t understand why I’m resistant. I know Jen can do the work, but I don’t have a voice. So this video has really shook me up!

  25. radioturtle says:

    In Missouri ABA is something we have to fight very hard for. I was told it was a “crack pot theory” and not to worry about it. Your story so closely parallels ours. We have just begun to fight. I admire you. God bless you! I hope you don’t mind if I borrow your concept for my next IEP meeting. :)
    To every parent out there… our voices ARE heard. Keep on beating the drums for our children. There IS hope with early intervention. There is SO MUCH hope!!!

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