Iח tһіѕ video I discuss һοw eye contact һаѕ mаԁе mе feel, аחԁ һοw I һаνе overcome tһаt aspect οf mу life.

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25 Responses to “Insights from an Autistic: Eye Contact”
  1. armankhodaei says:

    @jenodurward Thank you :) The work you are doing sounds very important and might save many people’s lives.

  2. jenodurward says:

    @armankhodaei,
    I have learned so much from you. You are a wonderful inspiration to a parent with a child with Asperger’s. I am in the process of completing my last year in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner school and I am doing an independent study called Evidence Base Practice: Assessing for Depression and Suicidality in HFASD. Right now, there isn’t much documentation out there. Also, there isn’t a strong link that is has clear documentation.

  3. armankhodaei says:

    @jenodurward Thank you. I am glad to hear that the glasses have had made an impact on your child’s ability to make eye contact. :)

  4. armankhodaei says:

    @misstiggykins I gave a talk to teachers and parents today and someone brought this up. I think Temple Grandin also mentions it.

  5. jenodurward says:

    It is called mindblindness. This may help with getting some answers. Please google it and it is very interesting.

  6. jenodurward says:

    I saw your view about a year ago and decided to take a give your idea about using nonprescription glasses to help those with Asperger’s. My son is 7 and we started using nonprescriptive glasses on him in the first grade. When he got them he told the teacher that they are used to help him look at her in the eye. He is still wearing them and I have noticed a huge change in his eye contact. It does decrease when he is not wearing them. Thanks so much for your videos.

  7. jenodurward says:

    Arman,

    I saw your view about a year ago and decided to take a give your idea about using nonprescription glasses to help those with Asperger’s. My son is 7 and we started using nonprescriptive glasses on him in the first grade. When he got them he told the teacher that they are used to help him look at her in the eye. He is still wearing them and I have noticed a huge change in his eye contact. It does decrease when he is not wearing them. Thanks so much for your videos.

  8. misstiggykins says:

    However, I wonder if the difficulty reading facial expressions is due to the child habitually avoiding eye contact and faces. When I look at a person’s face I see too much information. I start noticing whether they have freckles, what colour their eyes are etc. There’s so much information that I get distracted and cannot listen to what they are saying and so I lose track of the conversation.

    I wonder if anyone else has experienced this?

  9. misstiggykins says:

    I so understand how eye contact used to make you feel that people could look right into your soul… As a child I didn’t make eye contact at all because looking into someone’s eyes was as bad as staring at the sun. I felt overwhelmed and frightened. I was also frightened of people’s faces.

    It is often said that the reason why autistics don’t make eye contact is because they are unable to read facial expressions (CONT)

  10. armankhodaei says:

    @gigemlaw You are welcome. I think that can make a big difference in that person’s life whoever they are. :)

  11. gigemlaw says:

    Thank you for posting your glasses insight. I have someone to give that advice to.

  12. KSitz77 says:

    arman, i never made eye contact until I was in my 40′s with people I didn’t know well. It was like I was too shy. Also I have never really cared about soc ially being in the “crowd”. Maybe I have Asperger’s Sybdrome. I can relate you saying it is painful to make eye contact but I always thoght it was because I was shy.

  13. armankhodaei says:

    @gasmbay To be honest, I don’t know why I sometimes feel that way. It has been that way for me since I was a child. I think that people’s eyes can really tell a lot about a person, and I feel as if my eyes reveal a lot about me if people look directly into them.

  14. gasmbay says:

    why do you think you feel that way when you make eye contact? that people could “See inside your soul”? its very interesting

  15. afewminutesforyou says:

    @armankhodaei

    Well, I can look someone at the eyes, but it’s not something I will automatically do at any time.

  16. armankhodaei says:

    I’ve had that mentioned to me a couple of times as well–though I really have improved my ability to make eye contact, so that doesn’t happen as often as it used to.

  17. afewminutesforyou says:

    @armankhodaei But I don’t really like looking at people’s eyes and sometimes people mention how I don’t stare at their eyes.

  18. afewminutesforyou says:

    @armankhodaei

    Ok, I see. I only have trouble looking at someone if that person has trouble looking at me, or seems to read in my thought through my facial expression.

  19. armankhodaei says:

    That’s a really good question. And, I don’t exactly have the best answer for you. I think that you should put your zip code into google and see what comes up in your area. I wish there was more I could say. See if there are any autism groups in your area and join them. Hopefully, they would have some information to help point you in the right direction.

  20. armankhodaei says:

    I used to feel violated. I sometimes do depending of who and how someone looks me in the eyes. Yes, I do have trouble looking into the eyes of my relatives–most noticeably my dad.

  21. afewminutesforyou says:

    Do you really feel violated? I just fear that people might get insights on my aversion towards them. Do you have trouble looking at the eyes of your relatives?

  22. willyjones7 says:

    hi arman
    what would you suggest to a person who has just found out that they have aspergers syndrome,
    in regards to finding behavioral therapy classes, i have no idea where to look…
    thanks again mate :D

  23. armankhodaei says:

    @BlondRussianShemale Very true.

  24. BlondRussianShemale says:

    omg! i have had the same idea once! that i should try clear glasses as a “protective shield” to improve my eye contact, besides they can be rather fashionable

  25. armankhodaei says:

    Yah, without the glasses I tend to do the same, look straight at the person, but focusing more on something else, depends on the person. Some people’s eyes really intimidate me. I’ve been trying to do without my glasses for a couple of weeks now and have had some level of success.

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