Finding out tһаt a child іѕ autistic саח bе very difficult fοr a lot οf parents, bυt everyone deals wіtһ іt differently….!

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16 Responses to “Parents of an autistic child”
  1. NervousCricket says:

    This is just like my family! … except, I’m the parent with Autism and my husband is the one who thinks our son is suffering. How did you know my son loves to play in the refrigerator? :)

    Excellent video… thank you!

  2. psychoparent79 says:

    excellent video…. love the process of finding answers and coming to terms with it.

  3. OzAnthony says:

    hehehe i like it… well done =)

  4. GingerAutie says:

    Thanks! :)

  5. AwsomeCuban says:

    Great video 5 stars

  6. TheMadShangi says:

    You’re very welcome.

  7. GingerAutie says:

    Thanks, where can I pick up the medal? :p

  8. GingerAutie says:

    Thanks! :)

  9. TheMadShangi says:

    I like how the parents start blaming each other for their child’s autism. Spot-on satire.

  10. peaceandparty says:

    excellent reply and information thank you!

  11. peaceandparty says:

    wow
    that is another excellent video
    wow
    you are really talented in getting across the points
    very very good
    i will favourite this like i have with all the other ones
    wow you deserve a medal for this excellent stuff—-phew—brilliant!

  12. 1210donna says:

    yes, there is Verbal Agnosia and Auditory Verbal Agnosia. I have both. The first is meaning deafness, the second complicates meaning deafness by making sounds all compete (so speech and air con mingle up). And a lesser form of this can result in delayed processing or ability to get the literal meaning but not have processing time to go beyond that.

  13. GingerAutie says:

    Thanks for all that information. I don’t don’T have so much trouble myself with reading body language. I don’t identivy with the term Alexithymia, because I am full of emotions but can’t put them in the right terms a lot of times. I have more troulbe with the social aspects of language, to understand double meanings and all that, but most of it is language based. Do you know how this is called?

  14. 1210donna says:

    Alexithymia and agnosia can both be found on wikipedia. Alexithymia is common to 85% of people dx’d with autism and makes it very hard to read one’s own feelings, personalise or verbalise them. Social emotional agnosia is the inability to read facial expression or body language, probably common to 80-90% of people dx’d with autism.

  15. GingerAutie says:

    Thanks for your comment. I don’t know exactly about the diagnostic criterias of social-emotioanl agnosia or alexithymia, I just make the videos how they seem right to me. It just comes to me and on the beginning I don’t know the endind. I just developes it self” I would say.

  16. 1210donna says:

    how funny, how concise, you’ve done a great job. He’s explaining Alexithymia (personality condition) and Social-Emotional agnosia though. It would be great if we can call the parts of autism what they actually are… each part already has its own word and we’ve mystified it by calling it ALL ‘the autism‘. I agree that my personality and my own agnosias don’t need cure, but adaptations and strategies to get by in a non-agnosic world are essential.

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