Mу eight year οƖԁ son іѕ being interviewed οח һοw һе feels wһеח һе іѕ stimming (wһаt һе sees & hears, etc.)

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18 Responses to “Stimming & Aspergers- Anthony’s Description”
  1. MrBlastoise09 says:

    Im now 18 and I am an Aspie. I still stim but not like Anthony. I have a pen that i shake around while im pacing. I am also more aware of what I am doing than Anthony seems to be but I can still be startled when someone tries to get my attention. I hope Anthony doesnt ever have as much trouble learning to drive as I did. lol

  2. l0vingm0m says:

    We are going to be updating Anthony’s interview because he is now able to communicate more clearly what exactly is going on when he is stimming (stay tuned) and thank you for all the positive feed back.

  3. Weisenheimer78 says:

    This is fascinating (and my son does that exact movement when he’s excited!) You have contributed to improving his life by educating his mom.

  4. ciaranjamesmc says:

    As far as being better some days than others – stress, hunger and the amount of sleep I’ve had make a big difference in how aware I am of my actions, and how well I can cope. (That’s true for everyone, I think!) Even on good days, I stim and it feels healthy, but it’s on the bad days that I have a harder time choosing when I do. I’ve recently tried to choose work that plays to my strengths and allows for those little breaks – and freelance work from home, too, so i can stim away without worry!

  5. ciaranjamesmc says:

    I can control it to a certain extent, and for a certain amount of time. When I’m at work, I can usually avoid it – if I’ve had a particularly hard interaction or am stressed, I try to find a private space – even the bathroom – to pace and stim for a minute or two. Exercise helps. Having a living situation where i can stim helps, too – knowing that I can be home and fully be myself makes self-control during the workday easier.

  6. l0vingm0m says:

    That’s interesting, thank you for sharing this with us. Can you control it? My concern is that he will be an adult doing this? There are days it seems better and there are days it seems much more intense. What are your thoughts?

  7. lucieann21 says:

    um.. probably cuz youtube is huge and she is trying to help other parents whose children could possible have Aspergers syndrome!

  8. Piper227 says:

    I agree I am autistic and I stim a good deal. Stimming can last for a lot longer then a minute for one. there are MANNY forms of stimming but stimming is often done to self sooth is stressful situation or over stimulating enviorments. U used to have siezer but I did grow out of those. He could have a mild form of epilepsey. I think he is stimming in the vide when he plays with the gras and at 3:50. Stimming is a good and healthy thing for an autistic indavidual, the need to stim could decrease

  9. drmaier says:

    How nice that your son can articulate these things for everyone else who can’t. I have also suspected that my son is not able to hear me or stop his verbal stimming, it is very loud but I understand that he is just processing something that makes him excited. Thanks for your video. Your little guy is adorable.

  10. l0vingm0m says:

    Thank you for taking the time to respond. Yes, Anthony has Asperger’s syndrome. Asperger’s mostly shows itself in Anthony by anxiety and obsessing. He has what his doctor refers to “approach avoidance”. He wants to do something but he is so overwhelmed with anxiety about it. He then feels bad about himself because he really does want to do it.

  11. VVeikka says:

    continued…

    But what is this? For a while I was diagnosed epilectic but it was cancelled and I never got a proper diagnosis. I don’t consider stimming itself a big problem but I do think that it related to some other problems I have. The problems are not due to lack of intellect, I have a PhD, but in many ways I do feel impaired. If your son has got Asperger’s, how do you notice it except for stimming?

    Please let me know what ever you know about this.

  12. VVeikka says:

    Thank you for uploading the video. I could have used the same words 30 years ago to describe my stimming. My stims started when I was about five years old and they were pretty wild including hands, jaws, and eyes. But very reminiscent of your son’s posing. As a pre-teen I started to suppress my stims making the movements smaller especially in company. The suppression was not a conscious process but it happened. I still do stim as a middle-aged man even though considerably less than as a kid.

  13. ciaranjamesmc says:

    continued…
    The good news is that I learned to control when it happened and also filter it into more socially appropriate outlets. But if I’m cut off from stimming at all, I feel like my brain can’t truly process anything beyond a superficial level after a while. All of the stimuli sits in a holding pattern, waiting to be sifted through, and it eventually builds up to too much to handle!

  14. ciaranjamesmc says:

    Hi there,
    First of all, this is a great idea for a video, and your son is really smart and expressive. Good for you, and for him!
    I’m 27, and I still stim. It’s a lot like he says – when I’m thinking of something really intriguing or exciting, my brain wants to go into that stimming mode – and if I’m alone and in private space, I let it. This allows me to more deeply parse the interactions I’ve had during the day.

  15. Yummin8r says:

    Why are you posting this on youtube? Post it on a Children With Asbergers or something website. Nice Video though

  16. PrettyNeckslashes says:

    sounds like epilepsy

  17. l0vingm0m says:

    Thank you for taking the time to watch our video and then to respond. Our hope is that others will share with us what they have learned about stimming.

  18. ziggledog says:

    So helpful – thank you!!!

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